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This program contains 5 parts and 2 optional parts at the end:
 
 
This program contains 5 parts and 2 optional parts at the end:
 
 
 
Over 1,000 international speakers from 78 countries and with varying levels of English provided input into this program.
 
Their experiences of communicating with native-English speakers form the backbone of this training.
 

One of the main questions we asked was:
 
'What advice would you give native-English speakers in order to improve the communication process?'

 
You will hear their advice throughout the program and see statistical results from our research.
 
 
 
 
Over 1,000 international speakers from 78 countries and with varying levels of English provided input into this program.
 
Their experiences of communicating with native-English speakers form the backbone of this training.
 

One of the main questions we asked was:
 
'What advice would you give native-English speakers in order to improve the communication process?'

 
You will hear their advice throughout the program and see statistical results from our research.
 
 
 
INTRODUCTION
 
This video looks at why communication can be difficult.

 
 
 
INTRODUCTION
 
This video looks at why communication can be difficult.

 
 
 
ADJUSTING YOUR ENGLISH
 
This video explains when you may need to filter your language to improve communication.

 
ADJUSTING YOUR ENGLISH
 
This video explains when you may need to filter your language to improve communication.

 
 

We all have biases, even if we're unaware of many of them.

But please ....  don't EVER think that a person's level of English is indicative of their intelligence.

Or even worse, that your opinion somehow matters more than that of a non-native English speaker just because your English is better.


"The only thing more dangerous than ignorance is arrogance"
Albert Einstein

 

Everyone's opinion needs to be heard if we're to make better decisions.

 

 

We all have biases, even if we're unaware of many of them.

But please ....  don't EVER think that a person's level of English is indicative of their intelligence.

Or even worse, that your opinion somehow matters more than that of a non-native English speaker just because your English is better.


"The only thing more dangerous than ignorance is arrogance"
Albert Einstein

 

Everyone's opinion needs to be heard if we're to make better decisions.

 

PRONUNCIATION

Why is English pronunciation difficult for international speakers?


 
PRONUNCIATION

Why is English pronunciation difficult for international speakers?


 
 
English spelling and sounds can be tricky!
 
 
 
 
English spelling and sounds can be tricky!
 
 
 
 
 
SIMPLE EXPRESSIONS

This video explains why some English expressions can be difficult to understand and how to avoid them when talking to international speakers.


 
SIMPLE EXPRESSIONS

This video explains why some English expressions can be difficult to understand and how to avoid them when talking to international speakers.


 
IDIOMATIC LANGUAGE
 
Here's a list of the type of expressions to avoid at all costs always when communicating with international speakers.
 
Chances are they will have no idea what you're talking about.
 
 
 
IDIOMATIC LANGUAGE
 
Here's a list of the type of expressions to avoid at all costs always when communicating with international speakers.
 
Chances are they will have no idea what you're talking about.
 
 
 
 
A bigger bang for your buck
A shot in the arm
Acid test - The
All singing, all dancing
An arm and a leg
Back to the drawing board
Barking up the wrong tree
Between a rock and a hard place
Blast from the past - A
Brownie points
Bury the hatchet
Catch 22
Climb on the bandwagon
Cost an arm and a leg
Cut to the chase
Doom and gloom
Double whammy
Down the tubes
Face the music
Filthy rich
 
 
 
 
Flavor of the month - The
Fly off the handle
Foot in the door - A
Gung ho
Have an axe to grind
Heads up - A
Hold your horses
In spades
In the bag
Jobs for the boys
Jump on the bandwagon
Jump the gun
Jury is still out - The
Level playing field - A
Lose your marbles
Make a bee-line for
More bang for your buck
My bad
No-brainer - A
Off the record
 
 
 
On cloud nine
Pass the buck
Pie in the sky
Piece of cake - A
Pull the wool over your eyes
Quality time
Rise and shine
Road rage
Run a mile
Run of the mill
Sitting pretty
Smoke and mirrors
Sold down the river
Spill the beans
The pits
The whole nine yards
Top notch
Wear the trousers
What you see is what you get
 
 
 
 
 
A bigger bang for your buck
A shot in the arm
Acid test - The
All singing, all dancing
An arm and a leg
Back to the drawing board
Barking up the wrong tree
Between a rock and a hard place
Blast from the past - A
Brownie points
Bury the hatchet
Catch 22
Climb on the bandwagon
Cost an arm and a leg
Cut to the chase
Doom and gloom
Double whammy
Down the tubes
Face the music
Filthy rich
 
 
 
 
Flavor of the month - The
Fly off the handle
Foot in the door - A
Gung ho
Have an axe to grind
Heads up - A
Hold your horses
In spades
In the bag
Jobs for the boys
Jump on the bandwagon
Jump the gun
Jury is still out - The
Level playing field - A
Lose your marbles
Make a bee-line for
More bang for your buck
My bad
No-brainer - A
Off the record
 
 
 
On cloud nine
Pass the buck
Pie in the sky
Piece of cake - A
Pull the wool over your eyes
Quality time
Rise and shine
Road rage
Run a mile
Run of the mill
Sitting pretty
Smoke and mirrors
Sold down the river
Spill the beans
The pits
The whole nine yards
Top notch
Wear the trousers
What you see is what you get
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

AVOIDING DIFFICULT EXPRESSIONS
 

So, we suggest that it is sensible to avoid using certain English expressions. But what can we say instead? Here are some ideas to help.

 

Match these expressions to their plain English meaning:

 


AVOIDING DIFFICULT EXPRESSIONS
 

So, we suggest that it is sensible to avoid using certain English expressions. But what can we say instead? Here are some ideas to help.

 

Match these expressions to their plain English meaning:

 

GIVE A HEADS UP
Lots of
Something you are confident will be confirmed
To join or follow something once it is successful or popular
Give advance warning
To start something too early, before it is advisable
Wait
HOLD YOUR HORSES
Lots of
Something you are confident will be confirmed
To join or follow something once it is successful or popular
Give advance warning
To start something too early, before it is advisable
Wait
IN SPADES
Lots of
Something you are confident will be confirmed
To join or follow something once it is successful or popular
Give advance warning
To start something too early, before it is advisable
Wait
IN THE BAG
Lots of
Something you are confident will be confirmed
To join or follow something once it is successful or popular
Give advance warning
To start something too early, before it is advisable
Wait
JUMP ON THE BANDWAGON
Lots of
Something you are confident will be confirmed
To join or follow something once it is successful or popular
Give advance warning
To start something too early, before it is advisable
Wait
JUMP THE GUN
Lots of
Something you are confident will be confirmed
To join or follow something once it is successful or popular
Give advance warning
To start something too early, before it is advisable
Wait

AVOIDING DIFFICULT EXPRESSIONS
 

At the end of this program you can download more expressions to avoid when communicating with international speakers.

 

 


AVOIDING DIFFICULT EXPRESSIONS
 

At the end of this program you can download more expressions to avoid when communicating with international speakers.

 

 

PHRASAL VERBS
 
This video shows why phrasal verbs are confusing & how to avoid them.

 
PHRASAL VERBS
 
This video shows why phrasal verbs are confusing & how to avoid them.

 
 
AVOIDING PHRASAL VERBS
 

So, we suggest that it is sensible to avoid phrasal verbs. But what can we say instead? Here are some ideas to help.

 

Match these expressions to their plain English meaning:

 
 
 
 
AVOIDING PHRASAL VERBS
 

So, we suggest that it is sensible to avoid phrasal verbs. But what can we say instead? Here are some ideas to help.

 

Match these expressions to their plain English meaning:

 
 
 
I hate to BRING IT UP but …
Volunteer
Provide information
Thought of
Escape the consequences
Evade
Mention
Have you COME UP WITH any ideas yet?
Volunteer
Provide information
Thought of
Escape the consequences
Evade
Mention
I hope someone will COME FORWARD to help with this report.
Volunteer
Provide information
Thought of
Escape the consequences
Evade
Mention
I’ll FILL YOU IN on the details later
Volunteer
Provide information
Thought of
Escape the consequences
Evade
Mention
You’ll never GET AWAY with it
Volunteer
Provide information
Thought of
Escape the consequences
Evade
Mention
Some people know all the different ways to GET AROUND tax laws
Volunteer
Provide information
Thought of
Escape the consequences
Evade
Mention
SIMPLE EXPLANATIONS

This video looks at how to explain difficult words in a simple way.


 
SIMPLE EXPLANATIONS

This video looks at how to explain difficult words in a simple way.


 
 

GRAMMAR
 
Grammar is the system and structure of a language. The rules of grammar help us decide:
 
    • the order we put words in, and
    • which form of a word to use

English grammar can be difficult for non-native speakers. We need to be aware how we use grammar so that we can be understood.

 

 

 

GRAMMAR
 
Grammar is the system and structure of a language. The rules of grammar help us decide:
 
    • the order we put words in, and
    • which form of a word to use

English grammar can be difficult for non-native speakers. We need to be aware how we use grammar so that we can be understood.

 

 

WHY ENGLISH IS DIFFICULT

Why is English grammar often difficult for international speakers to learn?

If we can understand the challenges international speakers face we can focus on what they mean rather than any “mistakes” they make.


 
WHY ENGLISH IS DIFFICULT

Why is English grammar often difficult for international speakers to learn?

If we can understand the challenges international speakers face we can focus on what they mean rather than any “mistakes” they make.


 


PAST TENSES - BE AWARE
 
 
The English language has many ways of expressing the past.
 
For example:
  • I worked
  • I was working
  • I have worked
  • I have been working
  • I had worked
  • I had been working


PAST TENSES - BE AWARE
 
 
The English language has many ways of expressing the past.
 
For example:
  • I worked
  • I was working
  • I have worked
  • I have been working
  • I had worked
  • I had been working
   PAST TENSES - BE AWARE  
 
 
These past tenses often have no equivalent in other languages. Therefore, try to use the simplest grammar wherever you can.
 
For example:
 
  • 'I spoke to the client about her requirements'

… will normally be better than:
  • 'I have been speaking to the client about her requirements'
   PAST TENSES - BE AWARE  
 
 
These past tenses often have no equivalent in other languages. Therefore, try to use the simplest grammar wherever you can.
 
For example:
 
  • 'I spoke to the client about her requirements'

… will normally be better than:
  • 'I have been speaking to the client about her requirements'

   PAST TENSES - BE AWARE  
 
 
We also use PAST tenses to talk about… THE PRESENT:
 
  • If Jack was negotiating they would probably win the contract
  • Jack is a good negotiator
 
Hypothetical situations:
  • I would stay late if my manager needed me to
  • I am happy to stay late
 
Wishes:
  • I wish the commute wasn’t so long
  • I don't like the commute because it is too long
 
And to be polite:
  • Excuse me, I was wondering if this was the room for the finance meeting?
  • Is the finance meeting in this room?
 
 
Imagine how confusing that is to international speakers!
Try to use simple grammar when you can.
 

   PAST TENSES - BE AWARE  
 
 
We also use PAST tenses to talk about… THE PRESENT:
 
  • If Jack was negotiating they would probably win the contract
  • Jack is a good negotiator
 
Hypothetical situations:
  • I would stay late if my manager needed me to
  • I am happy to stay late
 
Wishes:
  • I wish the commute wasn’t so long
  • I don't like the commute because it is too long
 
And to be polite:
  • Excuse me, I was wondering if this was the room for the finance meeting?
  • Is the finance meeting in this room?
 
 
Imagine how confusing that is to international speakers!
Try to use simple grammar when you can.
 
 
 
 
 

   NOUNS
 
Some nouns are the names of things that aren’t a physical object.
 
For example: 
  • a process
  • a technique
  • an emotion
 
These are formed from verbs.
 
For example:
 
 
VERB NOUN
complete completion
introduce introduction
provide provision
fail failure
arrange arrangement
investigate investigation
 
 

   NOUNS
 
Some nouns are the names of things that aren’t a physical object.
 
For example: 
  • a process
  • a technique
  • an emotion
 
These are formed from verbs.
 
For example:
 
 
VERB NOUN
complete completion
introduce introduction
provide provision
fail failure
arrange arrangement
investigate investigation
 
 

   WHAT'S WRONG WITH THAT?
 
 
Using this type of noun can make sentences long-winded and difficult.
 
For example:
 
We had a discussion about the problem
We discussed the problem
 
 
The implementation of the strategy has been carried out by a team.
A team has implemented the strategy.
 
 

   WHAT'S WRONG WITH THAT?
 
 
Using this type of noun can make sentences long-winded and difficult.
 
For example:
 
We had a discussion about the problem
We discussed the problem
 
 
The implementation of the strategy has been carried out by a team.
A team has implemented the strategy.
 
 
SIMPLE SENTENCES

This video looks at how to simplify sentences to make communication clearer.


 
SIMPLE SENTENCES

This video looks at how to simplify sentences to make communication clearer.


 
SLOW DOWN / PAUSE

WHY it is important to speak slowly and clearly and HOW to do it.

 
SLOW DOWN / PAUSE

WHY it is important to speak slowly and clearly and HOW to do it.

 
analyze

This video shows how the SayWhat Vocabulary Analyzer can check whether the words you use are likely to be understood by non-native speakers.

 
 

 
analyze

This video shows how the SayWhat Vocabulary Analyzer can check whether the words you use are likely to be understood by non-native speakers.

 
 

 
Congratulations - you have completed the main part of the training!
 
HOWEVER - you now have the option to look at an extra section on Cultural Differences & Politeness.

Alternatively, you can skip this section and go directly to the review of the programme.
I'm finished - please take me to the Summary
I'd like to continue - take me to the Cultural Differences and Politeness
CULTURAL DIFFERENCES

Awareness of cultural differences can help us improve communication.


 
CULTURAL DIFFERENCES

Awareness of cultural differences can help us improve communication.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

BODY LANGUAGE
 

The businessman on the left seems unaware that he has committed a major gaffe. As you probably know, in Middle Eastern cultures it is insulting to cross an ankle over a knee and display the sole of the shoe while talking to another person.

Conducting business just became more complicated.

Should we expect other cultures to adopt our customs or are we willing to adopt theirs

Certainly, if we wish to succeed it’s incumbent upon us to respect, learn, and understand more about the effective, yet powerful "silent language" of gestures.

 
 
 

BODY LANGUAGE
 

The businessman on the left seems unaware that he has committed a major gaffe. As you probably know, in Middle Eastern cultures it is insulting to cross an ankle over a knee and display the sole of the shoe while talking to another person.

Conducting business just became more complicated.

Should we expect other cultures to adopt our customs or are we willing to adopt theirs

Certainly, if we wish to succeed it’s incumbent upon us to respect, learn, and understand more about the effective, yet powerful "silent language" of gestures.

 
 
 

How aware are you of cultural differences in body language?

Try this exercise - hold up your main hand to display the number five - do it now.

Now change it to the number two.

If you're Anglo-Saxon, there's a 96% chance you'll be holding up your middle and index fingers.

If you're European, there's a 94% chance you'll be holding up your thumb and index finger.

Europeans start counting with the number one on the thumb, two on the index finger, three on the middle finger, and so on.

Anglo-Saxons count number one on the index finger, two on the middle finger and finish with five on the thumb.

The Chinese use one hand to count to 10.

 
 
 

How aware are you of cultural differences in body language?

Try this exercise - hold up your main hand to display the number five - do it now.

Now change it to the number two.

If you're Anglo-Saxon, there's a 96% chance you'll be holding up your middle and index fingers.

If you're European, there's a 94% chance you'll be holding up your thumb and index finger.

Europeans start counting with the number one on the thumb, two on the index finger, three on the middle finger, and so on.

Anglo-Saxons count number one on the index finger, two on the middle finger and finish with five on the thumb.

The Chinese use one hand to count to 10.

 
 
 

Use gestures
 
It can help to use more gestures than normal when speaking with international speakers.
 
For example, pointing to places helps when giving directions.
 
But be careful ... it can be a minefield!
 

Use gestures
 
It can help to use more gestures than normal when speaking with international speakers.
 
For example, pointing to places helps when giving directions.
 
But be careful ... it can be a minefield!
HAND GESTURES:

Some hand gestures can cause problems in different parts of the world. At the end of the program you can download our comprehensive hand gesture guide.


 
HAND GESTURES:

Some hand gestures can cause problems in different parts of the world. At the end of the program you can download our comprehensive hand gesture guide.


 
Well, if you've decided never to take your hands out of your pocket ever again you're not alone! 
 
Anyway ... here's some good news!!
 
Research has found that facial expressions and smiles register the same meanings to people almost everywhere.
Well, if you've decided never to take your hands out of your pocket ever again you're not alone! 
 
Anyway ... here's some good news!!
 
Research has found that facial expressions and smiles register the same meanings to people almost everywhere.

BLOWING YOUR NOSE

Europeans and Westerners blow their noses into a handkerchief or tissue while Asians spit or snort. Each is appalled by the others' behavior.

This cultural difference is the result of the spread of tuberculosis in past centuries. In Europe, governments instructed people to blow their nose to avoid further spreading this deadly disease. This is why Westerners react so strongly to spitting - spitting would have spread TB.

If TB had been a problem in Eastern countries, the cultural reaction might have been the same.

Asians believe, correctly, that it is a healthier option to spit but it is a habit that is repulsive to Westerners. This is why business meetings between Westerners and Asians can fail when they've all got a cold.

The Japanese are appalled when someone produces a handkerchief, blows their nose into it and puts it back in their pocket or up their sleeve!

In Asian countries, the English custom of men wearing a handkerchief in their jacket top pocket is the equivalent of dangling a roll of toilet paper, ready for action.

So don't feel upset by an Asian who spits or snorts and never blow your nose in front of a Japanese person.


BLOWING YOUR NOSE

Europeans and Westerners blow their noses into a handkerchief or tissue while Asians spit or snort. Each is appalled by the others' behavior.

This cultural difference is the result of the spread of tuberculosis in past centuries. In Europe, governments instructed people to blow their nose to avoid further spreading this deadly disease. This is why Westerners react so strongly to spitting - spitting would have spread TB.

If TB had been a problem in Eastern countries, the cultural reaction might have been the same.

Asians believe, correctly, that it is a healthier option to spit but it is a habit that is repulsive to Westerners. This is why business meetings between Westerners and Asians can fail when they've all got a cold.

The Japanese are appalled when someone produces a handkerchief, blows their nose into it and puts it back in their pocket or up their sleeve!

In Asian countries, the English custom of men wearing a handkerchief in their jacket top pocket is the equivalent of dangling a roll of toilet paper, ready for action.

So don't feel upset by an Asian who spits or snorts and never blow your nose in front of a Japanese person.

POLITENESS

This video looks at how to be polite in different cultures.


 
POLITENESS

This video looks at how to be polite in different cultures.


 

CRITICISMS AND COMPLAINTS

 

Use positive words – e.g. good rather than bad - where you can:

  • This is not good 
  • This is bad 
 
 

CRITICISMS AND COMPLAINTS

 

Use positive words – e.g. good rather than bad - where you can:

  • This is not good 
  • This is bad 
 
 

BE DIRECT
 
The 'communication gap': this happens because some cultures speak in more 'explicit' terms while others speak in more 'implicit' terms.
 

A real-life example:

Pablo Díaz, a Mexican executive has worked in China for a Chinese textile company for 15 years.

"In China, the message up front is not necessarily the real message," Díaz said. "My Chinese colleagues would drop hints, and I wouldn't pick them up. Later, when thinking it over, I would realize I had missed something important."

Case in point, this conversation:

 

Mr. Díaz: It looks like some of us are going to have to be here on Sunday to host the client visit.

Mr. Chen: I see.

Mr. Díaz: Can you join us on Sunday?

Mr. Chen: Yes, I think so.

Mr. Díaz: That would be a great help.

Mr. Chen: Yes, Sunday is an important day.

Mr. Díaz: In what way?

Mr. Chen: It's my daughter's birthday.

Mr. Díaz: How nice. I hope you all enjoy it.

Mr. Chen: Thank you. I appreciate your understanding.

 

"I was quite certain he had said he was coming," Díaz said. "And Mr. Chen was quite certain he had communicated that he absolutely could not come because he was going to be celebrating his daughter's birthday with his family."

Díaz learned from this experience that it's his responsibility to ask multiple times for clarification to understand what his workers really mean.
 
 

BE DIRECT
 
The 'communication gap': this happens because some cultures speak in more 'explicit' terms while others speak in more 'implicit' terms.
 

A real-life example:

Pablo Díaz, a Mexican executive has worked in China for a Chinese textile company for 15 years.

"In China, the message up front is not necessarily the real message," Díaz said. "My Chinese colleagues would drop hints, and I wouldn't pick them up. Later, when thinking it over, I would realize I had missed something important."

Case in point, this conversation:

 

Mr. Díaz: It looks like some of us are going to have to be here on Sunday to host the client visit.

Mr. Chen: I see.

Mr. Díaz: Can you join us on Sunday?

Mr. Chen: Yes, I think so.

Mr. Díaz: That would be a great help.

Mr. Chen: Yes, Sunday is an important day.

Mr. Díaz: In what way?

Mr. Chen: It's my daughter's birthday.

Mr. Díaz: How nice. I hope you all enjoy it.

Mr. Chen: Thank you. I appreciate your understanding.

 

"I was quite certain he had said he was coming," Díaz said. "And Mr. Chen was quite certain he had communicated that he absolutely could not come because he was going to be celebrating his daughter's birthday with his family."

Díaz learned from this experience that it's his responsibility to ask multiple times for clarification to understand what his workers really mean.
 
 
 
 
AVOID UNDERSTATEMENT & SUBTLETY
 
Try to avoid understatement and subtlety.

 

“I’m not sure if this is really quite what I was looking for” 

“It would be nice if you could come to the meeting”

“Please come to the meeting”

 
 
 
AVOID UNDERSTATEMENT & SUBTLETY
 
Try to avoid understatement and subtlety.

 

“I’m not sure if this is really quite what I was looking for” 

“It would be nice if you could come to the meeting”

“Please come to the meeting”

 
 

 
AVOID OVERLY-POLITE LANGUAGE
 
Would it be possible to..?
I was wondering if you could..?
If you wouldn't mind terribly to..? 
 
A simple "can you X" or "is it Y” - followed with a "please" and "thank you" should be fine.
 
 
 

 
AVOID OVERLY-POLITE LANGUAGE
 
Would it be possible to..?
I was wondering if you could..?
If you wouldn't mind terribly to..? 
 
A simple "can you X" or "is it Y” - followed with a "please" and "thank you" should be fine.
 
 

POLITENESS
 
  1. Remember, we try to be polite to show people respect and to get things done.

  2. Nobody feels positive when projects fail due to misunderstandings.

  3. It is usually better to be simple and direct.
 

POLITENESS
 
  1. Remember, we try to be polite to show people respect and to get things done.

  2. Nobody feels positive when projects fail due to misunderstandings.

  3. It is usually better to be simple and direct.
 
OVERVIEW
  • Miscommunication can cost billions. Our international colleagues and customers say that WE – the native English speakers – are the hardest people to communicate with

  • 1.5 billion people speak English globally. 75% of them are non-native speakers

  • Native speakers are in the minority and we need to alter our English to improve communication


Hopefully, this program has given you some ideas about how to help.

OVERVIEW
  • Miscommunication can cost billions. Our international colleagues and customers say that WE – the native English speakers – are the hardest people to communicate with

  • 1.5 billion people speak English globally. 75% of them are non-native speakers

  • Native speakers are in the minority and we need to alter our English to improve communication


Hopefully, this program has given you some ideas about how to help.

SUMMARY

ADJUSTING YOUR ENGLISH

Look for signs that the person you are talking to needs you to adjust your English:

  • Speaking slowly
  • Hesitations
  • Using the same tense

But remember that peoples’ level of English can seem lower than it is.

A person’s level of English is NOT indicative of their intelligence.

SUMMARY

ADJUSTING YOUR ENGLISH

Look for signs that the person you are talking to needs you to adjust your English:

  • Speaking slowly
  • Hesitations
  • Using the same tense

But remember that peoples’ level of English can seem lower than it is.

A person’s level of English is NOT indicative of their intelligence.

SUMMARY

PRONUNCIATION

English is not a phonetic language. Words are not always pronounced the way they are written.

  • Though
  • Through
  • Cough
  • Rough
  • Plough
  • Ought
  • Borough

Some sounds in English do not exist in other languages.

Try to focus on WHAT people mean rather than HOW they say it.

And remember, globally, most English is spoken between non-native speakers. This means that our accent can sound very strange to them!

SUMMARY

PRONUNCIATION

English is not a phonetic language. Words are not always pronounced the way they are written.

  • Though
  • Through
  • Cough
  • Rough
  • Plough
  • Ought
  • Borough

Some sounds in English do not exist in other languages.

Try to focus on WHAT people mean rather than HOW they say it.

And remember, globally, most English is spoken between non-native speakers. This means that our accent can sound very strange to them!

SUMMARY

VOCABULARY

  • Try to use simple, logical expressions wherever possible

  • Avoid colorful expressions which don’t have a literal meaning

In spadesLots of

Jump the gunStart something too early

Hold your horsesWait

 

  • Try not to use phrasal verbs (verb + preposition / adverb) – they don’t have a literal meaning

Come up with (an idea) - Think of

Bring up (a problem)Mention

Get away with itEscape the consequences

 

  • If you need to explain what a word means, try to define it rather than use lots of alternatives

A stakeholder can be a client, customer, colleague, manager, owner, supplier

A stakeholder is anybody involved with a project

  • Use the SAY WHAT? Vocabulary Analyzer (here) to check whether your emails / written communication is likely to be understood by non-native speakers

SUMMARY

VOCABULARY

  • Try to use simple, logical expressions wherever possible

  • Avoid colorful expressions which don’t have a literal meaning

In spadesLots of

Jump the gunStart something too early

Hold your horsesWait

 

  • Try not to use phrasal verbs (verb + preposition / adverb) – they don’t have a literal meaning

Come up with (an idea) - Think of

Bring up (a problem)Mention

Get away with itEscape the consequences

 

  • If you need to explain what a word means, try to define it rather than use lots of alternatives

A stakeholder can be a client, customer, colleague, manager, owner, supplier

A stakeholder is anybody involved with a project

  • Use the SAY WHAT? Vocabulary Analyzer (here) to check whether your emails / written communication is likely to be understood by non-native speakers

SUMMARY

GRAMMAR
  • Some types of English grammar don’t have equivalents in other languages

  • Try to focus on what people mean rather than any “mistakes” they make

  • Try to use simple grammar where you can

SUMMARY

GRAMMAR
  • Some types of English grammar don’t have equivalents in other languages

  • Try to focus on what people mean rather than any “mistakes” they make

  • Try to use simple grammar where you can

SUMMARY

KEEP IT SIMPLE

Try to keep sentences to a maximum of 20 words.

Remove unnecessary information from sentences.

  • This plan is kind of interesting.
  • I’m slightly concerned about this proposal.

Avoid using fillers

  • Um, like, you know…

Try and speak slowly and clearly.

  • Allow people time to process what you have said
  • Allow people time to “translate” your words
  • Pause between phrases

Aim to speak at around 150 words per minute.

You can use the SAY WHAT? Rate of Speech analyser (here) to help you practise.

SUMMARY

KEEP IT SIMPLE

Try to keep sentences to a maximum of 20 words.

Remove unnecessary information from sentences.

  • This plan is kind of interesting.
  • I’m slightly concerned about this proposal.

Avoid using fillers

  • Um, like, you know…

Try and speak slowly and clearly.

  • Allow people time to process what you have said
  • Allow people time to “translate” your words
  • Pause between phrases

Aim to speak at around 150 words per minute.

You can use the SAY WHAT? Rate of Speech analyser (here) to help you practise.

And finally a few items to take away in your SAY WHAT? goody bag:
 
 
  1. The meaning of different hand gestures around the world - here

  2. Expressions to avoid - here

  3. Measure how fast you speak - here

  4. The SAY WHAT? Vocabulary Analyzer - here
 
And finally a few items to take away in your SAY WHAT? goody bag:
 
 
  1. The meaning of different hand gestures around the world - here

  2. Expressions to avoid - here

  3. Measure how fast you speak - here

  4. The SAY WHAT? Vocabulary Analyzer - here
 
Your feedback on this training?
Comments?
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