Manage existing quizzes, Custom Templates, Better Security, Data Exports and much more

Sign inSign in with Facebook
Sign inSign in with Google

SAT Verbal

First Name:
Last Name:
Email:
Phone:
School:
IMPORTANT REMINDERS

         This test contains 3 sections.
         1) Questions 1-17 Vocabulary (8 mins)
         2) Questions 18-38 Reading Test (26 mins)
         3) Questions 39-60 Writing and Language Test (16 mins)

You will have 50 minutes to complete the 60 questions.
 
Press "Next" to start.
IMPORTANT REMINDERS

         This test contains 3 sections.
         1) Questions 1-17 Vocabulary (8 mins)
         2) Questions 18-38 Reading Test (26 mins)
         3) Questions 39-60 Writing and Language Test (16 mins)

You will have 50 minutes to complete the 60 questions.
 
Press "Next" to start.
Word in Context

Question 1-2

     As part of their study of giant sequoias,
scientists have measured exactly how much water
these trees require. During the summer, each tree
pumps up around 2,000 liters of water from the
ground, a number that could climb as high as 3,000
liters a day for the largest specimens during the
hottest weather. Even so, by closing their leaf pores,
or stomata, and dropping some of their leaves, the
sequoias are able to weather droughts with surprising
resiliency.
Word in Context

Question 1-2

     As part of their study of giant sequoias,
scientists have measured exactly how much water
these trees require. During the summer, each tree
pumps up around 2,000 liters of water from the
ground, a number that could climb as high as 3,000
liters a day for the largest specimens during the
hottest weather. Even so, by closing their leaf pores,
or stomata, and dropping some of their leaves, the
sequoias are able to weather droughts with surprising
resiliency.
1. “climb” most nearly means
A) increase.
B) escalate.
C) clamber.
D) improve.
2. “weather” most nearly means
A) uphold.
B) surpass.
C) permit.
D) withstand.
Question 3

     In those days, and later as a young man, I used
to try to picture in my imagination the feelings and
ambitions of a white boy with absolutely no limit
placed upon his aspirations and activities. I used to
envy the white boy who had no obstacles placed in
the way of his becoming a Congressman, Governor,
Bishop, or President by reason of the accident of his
birth or race. I used to picture the way that I would act
under such circumstances; how I would begin at the
bottom and keep rising until I reached the highest
round of success.
Question 3

     In those days, and later as a young man, I used
to try to picture in my imagination the feelings and
ambitions of a white boy with absolutely no limit
placed upon his aspirations and activities. I used to
envy the white boy who had no obstacles placed in
the way of his becoming a Congressman, Governor,
Bishop, or President by reason of the accident of his
birth or race. I used to picture the way that I would act
under such circumstances; how I would begin at the
bottom and keep rising until I reached the highest
round of success.
3. “round” most nearly means
A) aspect.
B) procession.
C) enclosure.
D) rung.
Question 4

     The event had every promise of happiness for
her friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable
character, easy fortune, suitable age and pleasant
manners; and there was some satisfaction in
considering with what self-denying, generous
friendship she had always wished and promoted the
match; but it was a black morning’s work for her. The
want of Miss Taylor would be felt every hour of
every day. She recalled her past kindness—the
kindness, the affection of sixteen years—how she had
taught and how she had played with her from five
years old—how she had devoted all her powers to
attach and amuse her in health—and how nursed her
through the various illnesses of childhood.
Question 4

     The event had every promise of happiness for
her friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable
character, easy fortune, suitable age and pleasant
manners; and there was some satisfaction in
considering with what self-denying, generous
friendship she had always wished and promoted the
match; but it was a black morning’s work for her. The
want of Miss Taylor would be felt every hour of
every day. She recalled her past kindness—the
kindness, the affection of sixteen years—how she had
taught and how she had played with her from five
years old—how she had devoted all her powers to
attach and amuse her in health—and how nursed her
through the various illnesses of childhood.
4. “want” most nearly means
A) desire.
B) lack.
C) requirement.
D) request.
Idiom

Questions 5-11 are based on the following passage.

     I have always enjoyed traditional ballet, and I
even participated ❺ at a few dance recitals as I was
growing up. Yet I first experienced the world of non-
classical dance ❻ with seeing my first modern,
experimental dance performance this past summer.
For my birthday, I was given a ticket to a production
by the Alvin Ailey Dance Company. This celebrated
troupe was performing just a brief train ride away
to my hometown, presenting a repertoire of works
based ❽ by both African-American traditions and
modern theories of dynamism.
     It took me a little while to understand exactly
how an Alvin Ailey piece is meant to be interpreted;
in contrast to a traditional long ballet such as Swan
Lake, there is neither a storyline nor a definable main
character. However, it soon became clear to me that
everything in an Ailey routine has a purpose. Each set
of dances refers ❿ at historical or cultural forces, or to
ideas from society and religion.
     Perhaps the most cogent expression of this
artistic vision is the dance composition Revelations,
which is regarded as an Alvin Ailey masterpiece. A
performance ❶❶ by different movements,
Revelations includes references to the sacrament of
Baptism, to evil and sin, and to the pleasures of
worship and community. The finale reconciles these
themes in moment of true joy and redemption.
Idiom

Questions 5-11 are based on the following passage.

     I have always enjoyed traditional ballet, and I
even participated ❺ at a few dance recitals as I was
growing up. Yet I first experienced the world of non-
classical dance ❻ with seeing my first modern,
experimental dance performance this past summer.
For my birthday, I was given a ticket to a production
by the Alvin Ailey Dance Company. This celebrated
troupe was performing just a brief train ride away
to my hometown, presenting a repertoire of works
based ❽ by both African-American traditions and
modern theories of dynamism.
     It took me a little while to understand exactly
how an Alvin Ailey piece is meant to be interpreted;
in contrast to a traditional long ballet such as Swan
Lake, there is neither a storyline nor a definable main
character. However, it soon became clear to me that
everything in an Ailey routine has a purpose. Each set
of dances refers ❿ at historical or cultural forces, or to
ideas from society and religion.
     Perhaps the most cogent expression of this
artistic vision is the dance composition Revelations,
which is regarded as an Alvin Ailey masterpiece. A
performance ❶❶ by different movements,
Revelations includes references to the sacrament of
Baptism, to evil and sin, and to the pleasures of
worship and community. The finale reconciles these
themes in moment of true joy and redemption.
5.
A) NO CHANGE
B) in
C) on
D) with
6.
A) NO CHANGE
B) to see
C) by seeing
D) as seeing
7.
A) NO CHANGE
B) at
C) from
D) near
8.
A) NO CHANGE
B) for
C) to
D) on
9.
A) NO CHANGE
B) contrasting to
C) in contrast with
D) contrary with
10.
A) NO CHANGE
B) into
C) to
D) by
11.
A) NO CHANGE
B) with
C) in
D) from
Diction

Questions 12-17 are based on the following passage.

     For many years, the prospect of electric and
partially electric cars was seen by the market as an
❶❷ imminent reality. Now, hybrid cars are
everywhere on American roads, as evidenced by the
runaway popularity of the efficient and affordable
Toyota Prius. This vehicle’s success ❶❸ collaborates
earlier marketing research on the economic viability
of “green” cars, even though many buyers of hybrid
and electric cars are not solely concerned with saving
money. Consumers are now purchasing ❶❹ eloquent
and expensive models such as the BMW i8 and the
Tesla Model S. While some of these buyers merely
want to ❶❺ flout their wealth or indulge in a selfish
❶❻ allusion of greatness, others want to associate
themselves with a popular and worthwhile
❶❼ prospective on life: environmental activism.
Diction

Questions 12-17 are based on the following passage.

     For many years, the prospect of electric and
partially electric cars was seen by the market as an
❶❷ imminent reality. Now, hybrid cars are
everywhere on American roads, as evidenced by the
runaway popularity of the efficient and affordable
Toyota Prius. This vehicle’s success ❶❸ collaborates
earlier marketing research on the economic viability
of “green” cars, even though many buyers of hybrid
and electric cars are not solely concerned with saving
money. Consumers are now purchasing ❶❹ eloquent
and expensive models such as the BMW i8 and the
Tesla Model S. While some of these buyers merely
want to ❶❺ flout their wealth or indulge in a selfish
❶❻ allusion of greatness, others want to associate
themselves with a popular and worthwhile
❶❼ prospective on life: environmental activism.
12.
A) NO CHANGE
B) eminent
C) monetary
D) minute
13.
A) NO CHANGE
B) corrodes
C) corroborates
D) colludes
14.
A) NO CHANGE
B) elusive
C) locution
D) elegant
15.
A) NO CHANGE
B) flaunt
C) flourish
D) frown
16.
A) NO CHANGE
B) elusion
C) illusion
D) alternation
17.
A) NO CHANGE
B) perspective
C) perception
D) prospect
18. The main purpose of the passage is to
A) discuss an ecological phenomenon.
B) analyze a scientific experiment.
C) resolve an environmental debate.
D) draw attention to a historic discovery.
19. According to the passage, what was a direct result of the drop in the elk population at Yellowstone National Park?
A) An investigation of the grizzly bear population
B) A decrease in the number of aspen trees
C) An increase in fruit-bearing plants
D) A surge in the wolf population
20. Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?
A) Lines 6-8 (“A study . . . what”)
B) Lines 13-16 (“The over-browsed . . . hibernation”)
C) Lines 44-48 (“When . . . beavers”)
D) Lines 51-52 (“We put . . . course”)
21. According to the passage, one potential challenge to the survival of the grizzly bear population in Yellowstone National Park is a shortage of
A) elk.
B) beetles.
C) cottonwood trees.
D) whitebark pine trees.
22. Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?
A) Lines 28-31 (“Over... fell”)
B) Lines 52-56 (“In the... nuts”)
C) Lines 61-62 (“Ripple... regrow”)
D) Lines 62-64 (“It may... grizzlies”)
23. As used in line 11, “browsed” most nearly means
A) inspected.
B) skimmed.
C) destroyed.
D) grazed.
24. As used in line 59 , “diminishing” most nearly means
A) demolishing.
B) apprehensive.
C) apparent.
D) decreasing.
25. Which choice most closely captures the meaning of the figurative “big silver bullet” referred to in line 63?
A) Unexpected outcome
B) Tempting choice
C) Definitive solution
D) Dangerous event
26. The main purpose of the final paragraph of the passage is to
A) advise the reader of some potential limitations of Ripple’s conclusions about the nutritional needs of the grizzly bear.
B) extend the implications of the relationship between wolves and grizzlies in a particular environment to other animals and contexts.
C) describe a certain experiment that Ripple will be undertaking in the future to corroborate his findings.
D) suggest the potential ramifications of reintroducing another species into an already fragile ecosystem.
27. According to the table, the wolf/elk ratio experienced a decrease between which of the following years?
A) 1998 and 1999
B) 1999 and 2000
C) 2000 and 2001
D) 2003 and 2004
28. Which claim from the passage is most directly supported by the data given in the table?
A) Elk numbers in Yellowstone National Park showed an overall decline as a result of the introduction of wolves.
B) Elk numbers in Yellowstone National Park declined every year following the introduction of wolves.
C) Elk numbers in Yellowstone National Park in any given year decreased as the ratio of wolves to elk that year increased.
D) Elk numbers in Yellowstone National Park stabilized after an initial decline as wolf population numbers stabilized.
29. As used in line 23, “command” most nearly means
A) order.
B) dominate.
C) overlook.
D) deserve.
30. Thoreau makes which point about people who follow their consciences?
A) They often band together with other entities to form corporations.
B) They tend to have mutually antagonistic relationships with their governments.
C) They generally believe that the exercise of the moral sense is what makes them human.
D) They hold their legislators to a different moral standard than that to which they hold themselves.
31. Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?
A) Lines 1-3 (“Must . . . legislator”)
B) Lines 8-11 (“It is . . . conscience”)
C) Lines 18-23 (“In most . . . well”)
D) Lines 31-36 (“A very . . . by it”)
32. According to King, an unjust statute should not be
A) regarded as having moral authority.
B) broken in a manner intended to attract attention.
C) viewed as detrimental to the human spirit.
D) used to enforce obedience to moral law.
33. Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?
A) Lines 51-52 (“The answer... unjust”)
B) Lines 54-55 (“One... laws”)
C) Lines 55-58 (“one... all”)
D) Lines 67-68 (“Any... unjust”)
34. As used in line 60, “determine” most nearly means
A) establish.
B) regulate.
C) direct.
D) limit.
35. The primary purpose of each passage is to
A) make an argument about the relationship between the individual and the law.
B) advance a view on how laws could be made more just.
C) question a claim that the morality of actions depends on their consequences.
D) discuss a change in the nature of the state and its power over the individual.
36. Both authors would most likely agree with which statement about people who obey their government’s statutes?
A) They fail to follow the guidance of their consciences.
B) They are incapable of exercising moral judgment.
C) They may not be acting in accordance with justice.
D) They value personal morality over the public good.
37. In the passages, a significant difference in how the two authors discuss morality is that Thoreau indicates that
A) very few people follow their consciences, while King indicates that most people consistently adhere to moral laws.
B) people should do what they judge to be right, while King indicates that people should follow a universal moral code.
C) the morality of an action derives from its legal status, while King indicates that morality and human law are distinct.
D) even morally good laws should be disobeyed, while King indicates that people should follow just laws.
38. Assuming that he agrees with the assertions in the final paragraph of Passage 1, King would most likely recommend which course of action to Thoreau?
A) Thoreau should obey laws upholding slavery while they are in force but should work to repeal them.
B) Thoreau should view laws upholding slavery as immoral but should not break them since doing so would lead to anarchy.
C) Thoreau should break laws upholding slavery and in doing so should neither hide his actions nor try to avoid punishment.
D) Thoreau should openly criticize laws upholding slavery but should follow them since committing a crime would degrade his personality.
Questions 39-49 are based on the following passage.

Teaching the World to Swing

     In 1924, when jazz trumpeter Louis Armstrong
rehearsed with Fletcher Henderson’s band for the first
time, he shocked Henderson by refusing to ❸❾ bond
with the score as written and playing notes at whatever
volume he wanted. The other band members, who
were used to playing standard dance music in
meticulous, predictable arrangements, purportedly
responded to Armstrong’s untraditional methods with
skepticism and derision. Over a short time, though,
Armstrong won over Henderson and the band with his
undeniably brilliant musical talent.
     As band members grew to admire Armstrong’s
masterful ❹⓿ improvisations. They in turn began to
experiment with incorporating improvised solos of
their own. In one of the earliest recordings of
Armstrong playing with Henderson’s band, the band
mainly follows the standard written arrangement of a
dance song. The exceptions are a couple of short solos
—not only ❹❶ Armstrong’s performances but also by
saxophonist Coleman Hawkins. Not long afterward,
the group’s style transformed dramatically. A 1925
recording of “Sugarfoot Stomp” by Henderson’s band
features an extended solo by Armstrong, his trumpet
blazing out against the saxophone backup. ❹❷ Band
member Howard Scott recalls a particular night at the
Roseland Ballroom: “My goodness, people stopped
dancing to come around and listen to him. . . . The
next night you couldn’t get into the place.”
Questions 39-49 are based on the following passage.

Teaching the World to Swing

     In 1924, when jazz trumpeter Louis Armstrong
rehearsed with Fletcher Henderson’s band for the first
time, he shocked Henderson by refusing to ❸❾ bond
with the score as written and playing notes at whatever
volume he wanted. The other band members, who
were used to playing standard dance music in
meticulous, predictable arrangements, purportedly
responded to Armstrong’s untraditional methods with
skepticism and derision. Over a short time, though,
Armstrong won over Henderson and the band with his
undeniably brilliant musical talent.
     As band members grew to admire Armstrong’s
masterful ❹⓿ improvisations. They in turn began to
experiment with incorporating improvised solos of
their own. In one of the earliest recordings of
Armstrong playing with Henderson’s band, the band
mainly follows the standard written arrangement of a
dance song. The exceptions are a couple of short solos
—not only ❹❶ Armstrong’s performances but also by
saxophonist Coleman Hawkins. Not long afterward,
the group’s style transformed dramatically. A 1925
recording of “Sugarfoot Stomp” by Henderson’s band
features an extended solo by Armstrong, his trumpet
blazing out against the saxophone backup. ❹❷ Band
member Howard Scott recalls a particular night at the
Roseland Ballroom: “My goodness, people stopped
dancing to come around and listen to him. . . . The
next night you couldn’t get into the place.”
39.
A) NO CHANGE
B) emulate
C) adhere to
D) cohere with
40.
A) NO CHANGE
B) improvisations they
C) improvisations; they
D) improvisations, they
41.
A) NO CHANGE
B) Armstrong-performed solos
C) by Armstrong
D) Armstrong solos
42. At this point, the writer is considering adding the
following sentence

With these stunning solos, Armstrong became a
sensation with the patrons of local dance halls.

Should the writer make this addition here?
A) Yes, because it sets up the quotation in the following sentence.
B) Yes, because it explains why Armstrong was skilled at improvisation
C) No, because it merely repeats an idea stated earlier in the paragraph.
D) No, because it blurs the focus of the paragraph.
      ❹❸ In addition to incorporating solos into its
performances, the band evolved in other ways.
Henderson had been working with musician and
composer Don Redman to develop arrangements of
songs that used a call-and-response ❹❹ structure.
According to jazz historians Gary Giddins and Scott
DeVeaux, Redman acknowledged that he had, in fact,
❹❺ adjusted and altered the structure of his musical
arrangements in part to accommodate Armstrong’s
distinct style. Giddins and DeVeaux describe the
result as music ❹❻ that, “began to take on a
commanding directness and sharper rhythmic gait.”
      ❹❸ In addition to incorporating solos into its
performances, the band evolved in other ways.
Henderson had been working with musician and
composer Don Redman to develop arrangements of
songs that used a call-and-response ❹❹ structure.
According to jazz historians Gary Giddins and Scott
DeVeaux, Redman acknowledged that he had, in fact,
❹❺ adjusted and altered the structure of his musical
arrangements in part to accommodate Armstrong’s
distinct style. Giddins and DeVeaux describe the
result as music ❹❻ that, “began to take on a
commanding directness and sharper rhythmic gait.”
43. The writer is considering revising the underlined portion to the following.
A) NO CHANGE
B) Thanks to the enthusiastic patrons of New York City dance halls,
C) In addition to performing music arranged by Don Redman,
D) Despite their reputation as a somewhat conservative dance orchestra,
44. The writer is considering revising the underlined
portion to the following.

structure that, for example, featured a melody
played by the saxophone section followed by an
answer from the trumpet section

Should the writer make this addition here?
A) Yes, because it mentions the musical instrument that was associated with Armstrong.
B) Yes, because it clarifies a term used to describe Redman’s arrangements.
C) No, because it interrupts the discussion of Redman’s arrangements with irrelevant information.
D) No, because it diverges from the paragraph’s point about Henderson
45.
A) NO CHANGE
B) adjusted and changed
C) adjusted, through reworking,
D) adjusted
46.
A) NO CHANGE
B) that—
C) that
D) that:
      Armstrong left Henderson’s band in 1925. His
influence, ❹❼ for instance, is discernible in the
band’s later recordings. The collaboration between
Armstrong and Henderson had put into motion a
significant stylistic shift in jazz music: the polished
sound of dance-hall music had given ❹❽ away to the
prominent solo features and call-and-response
❹❾ arrangements, that would become hallmarks of
the 1930s swing era music.
      Armstrong left Henderson’s band in 1925. His
influence, ❹❼ for instance, is discernible in the
band’s later recordings. The collaboration between
Armstrong and Henderson had put into motion a
significant stylistic shift in jazz music: the polished
sound of dance-hall music had given ❹❽ away to the
prominent solo features and call-and-response
❹❾ arrangements, that would become hallmarks of
the 1930s swing era music.
47.
A) NO CHANGE
B) therefore,
C) likewise,
D) however,
48.
A) NO CHANGE
B) way to
C) in to
D) away for
49.
A) NO CHANGE
B) arrangements, which
C) arrangements, these
D) arrangements that
Questions 50-60 are based on the following passage.

Cleveland Rocks (for Artists)

      [1] It used to be that a move to a metropolis
such as New York City was an inevitable step for
aspiring artists. [2] Back when geography was
everything, an artist had to get her painting, song,
poem, or dance in front of as large an audience as
possible. [3] To some degree, these tales may have
been true. [4] That was much easier in a city with a
teeming population. [5] Geographical proximity
helped artists meet other artists, be inspired by them,
and compete with them. [6] Stories of talented,
ambitious young people getting by on “pluck and
luck” in the big city were commonplace. [7] These
days, however, they are more fiction than fact. ❺⓿
      Today the United States economy is much less
forgiving. Once ❺❶ an artist could make a living as a
temporary office worker or a waiter, leaving plenty of
time to practice your art. In many of the nation’s
largest cities, ❺❷ therefore, this life is no longer
possible. There are very few cheap, empty lofts
waiting to be transformed with an attitude and a
paintbrush. Real estate prices have skyrocketed, and
survival, for all but the luckiest few, has become more
difficult. In many large cities, affordable theaters, jazz
cafes, and art galleries are being replaced by ❺❸
other places, including expensive restaurants, couture
boutiques, and exclusive nightclubs, so there are
fewer and fewer opportunities for the artist just
starting out. When business leaders in New York, for
example, go ❺❹ so far as to declare the city a “luxury
brand,” they are not appealing to potential customers
who struggle to survive as artists.
Questions 50-60 are based on the following passage.

Cleveland Rocks (for Artists)

      [1] It used to be that a move to a metropolis
such as New York City was an inevitable step for
aspiring artists. [2] Back when geography was
everything, an artist had to get her painting, song,
poem, or dance in front of as large an audience as
possible. [3] To some degree, these tales may have
been true. [4] That was much easier in a city with a
teeming population. [5] Geographical proximity
helped artists meet other artists, be inspired by them,
and compete with them. [6] Stories of talented,
ambitious young people getting by on “pluck and
luck” in the big city were commonplace. [7] These
days, however, they are more fiction than fact. ❺⓿
      Today the United States economy is much less
forgiving. Once ❺❶ an artist could make a living as a
temporary office worker or a waiter, leaving plenty of
time to practice your art. In many of the nation’s
largest cities, ❺❷ therefore, this life is no longer
possible. There are very few cheap, empty lofts
waiting to be transformed with an attitude and a
paintbrush. Real estate prices have skyrocketed, and
survival, for all but the luckiest few, has become more
difficult. In many large cities, affordable theaters, jazz
cafes, and art galleries are being replaced by ❺❸
other places, including expensive restaurants, couture
boutiques, and exclusive nightclubs, so there are
fewer and fewer opportunities for the artist just
starting out. When business leaders in New York, for
example, go ❺❹ so far as to declare the city a “luxury
brand,” they are not appealing to potential customers
who struggle to survive as artists.
50. To make this paragraph most logical, sentence 3 should be placed
A) where it is now.
B) after sentence 1.
C) after sentence 4.
D) after sentence 6.
51.
A) NO CHANGE
B) artists
C) one
D) you
52.
A) NO CHANGE
B) however,
C) consequently,
D) for instance,
53. Which choice most effectively sets up the list of examples that follows in the sentence and completes the contrast introduced earlier in the sentence?
A) NO CHANGE
B) locations where artists are unlikely to spend money:
C) upscale venues such as
D) attractive options such as
54.
A) NO CHANGE
B) too far
C) farther
D) DELETE the underlined portion.
      One exception to this trend ❺❺ is Cleveland,
Ohio; a great place for young artists. Once a center for
manufacturing, Cleveland still boasts a well-
maintained infrastructure though many factories and
jobs have moved overseas. The city is working hard to
attract artists. In 2013 it hosted a “Welcome to
Cleveland” weekend, providing a steep discount for
hotels, paying fully for ground transportation, and
offering an array of meals and free cultural events to
artists who were willing to visit the city and consider
❺❻ moving to Cleveland. Perhaps the real sign of
welcome is Cleveland’s artist housing plan: homes
will be sold to qualifying artists at prices similar to
❺❼ an economy car. Cleveland may be doing the
most to attract the creative class, but many other
smaller cities, including Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania;
Corvallis, Oregon; and Burlington, Vermont, are
following ❺❽ its lead. ❺❾
      If you’re an artist trying to reach an audience,
move to a place where you can live well and where
you are needed. Don’t ❻⓿ undermine smaller cities
such as Cleveland as you search for your place of
inspiration.
      One exception to this trend ❺❺ is Cleveland,
Ohio; a great place for young artists. Once a center for
manufacturing, Cleveland still boasts a well-
maintained infrastructure though many factories and
jobs have moved overseas. The city is working hard to
attract artists. In 2013 it hosted a “Welcome to
Cleveland” weekend, providing a steep discount for
hotels, paying fully for ground transportation, and
offering an array of meals and free cultural events to
artists who were willing to visit the city and consider
❺❻ moving to Cleveland. Perhaps the real sign of
welcome is Cleveland’s artist housing plan: homes
will be sold to qualifying artists at prices similar to
❺❼ an economy car. Cleveland may be doing the
most to attract the creative class, but many other
smaller cities, including Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania;
Corvallis, Oregon; and Burlington, Vermont, are
following ❺❽ its lead. ❺❾
      If you’re an artist trying to reach an audience,
move to a place where you can live well and where
you are needed. Don’t ❻⓿ undermine smaller cities
such as Cleveland as you search for your place of
inspiration.
55.
A) NO CHANGE
B) is: Cleveland, Ohio, a
C) is Cleveland, Ohio—a
D) is Cleveland, Ohio (a
56.
A) NO CHANGE
B) the possibility of a potential move to Cleveland.
C) what it would be like to move there.
D) moving there.
57.
A) NO CHANGE
B) that of an economy car.
C) an economy car’s.
D) that of economy cars.
58.
A) NO CHANGE
B) they’re
C) it’s
D) their
59. At this point, the writer is considering adding the
following sentence.

In many cases, communities that are arts friendly
are bicycle friendly too.

Should the writer add this sentence here?
A) Yes, because it adds support to the writer’s stated claim that Cleveland is a great place for artists to live.
B) Yes, because it helps define the lifestyle priorities of those to whom the writer refers as the “creative class.”
C) No, because it adds a loosely related detail that the writer doesn’t connect to the claims made in the paragraph.
D) No, because it should be placed instead in the passage’s final paragraph to support the claim that artists can live well in smaller cities.
60.
A) NO CHANGE
B) discount
C) blow off
D) give the cold shoulder to
{"name":"SAT Verbal", "url":"https://www.quiz-maker.com/Q3UGNXJ","txt":"IMPORTANT REMINDERS          This test contains 3 sections.         1) Questions 1-17 Vocabulary (8 mins)         2) Questions 18-38 Reading Test (26 mins)         3) Questions 39-60 Writing and Language Test (16 mins) You will have 50 minutes to complete the 60 questions., Word in Context Question 1-2      As part of their study of giant sequoias,scientists have measured exactly how much waterthese trees require. During the summer, each treepumps up around 2,000 liters of water from theground, a number that could climb as high as 3,000liters a day for the largest specimens during thehottest weather. Even so, by closing their leaf pores,or stomata, and dropping some of their leaves, thesequoias are able to weather droughts with surprisingresiliency., 1. “climb” most nearly means","img":"https://www.quiz-maker.com/3012/images/ogquiz.png"}